Getting Familiar with my Camera Again

While in college, I took a minor in photography. The camera I used was a Minolta SLR a friend's grandmother gave me when she found out I needed a camera. This was before digital cameras, and I learned the ins and outs of that camera and every feature became second nature. The camera lasted through a lot of abuse I threw at it, until one day in 2005 it stopped working. I debated for a while whether to get it fixed or go digital. Eventually, I decided to get a Canon Digital SLR. And that was the day I stopped taking photos.
I had a hard time getting used to all the settings and how the camera "knew" better than me. I would pick the camera up every now and then and try to relearn it, but it wouldn't stick. Eventually, I had an iPhone in my pocket, and the point and shoot quality of the photos from the phone made the Canon DSLR feel obsolete.
The more I take photos of my ceramics, the more I believe I can improve on the iPhone pics. I want the photos to reflect my style and not simply be a means to display my work on Instagram. It was while deep in thought about how I can overcome my reluctance with my camera that an email came through from a local photographer, Jill C. Smith, promoting a workshop described as "Stop shooting in auto and learn how to harness your DSLR's full potential!" Sign me up!
I took the workshop with Jill and her fellow photographer Amanda Danzilo, and it gave me a much better understanding of my camera and why it wasn't doing what I wanted it to do! Along with the tips learned, they also recommended a different lens for the product shots I wanted to capture.
I have a lot of practice to do, but I feel the workshop and new lens have set me on the right path. I kept trying to figure it out on my own, and am so grateful for the timing of Jill and Amanda's workshop. Sometimes you need to ask for help, and be willing to invest the time, and sometimes money, to get to where you want to go.
iPhone Canon DLSR Kit Lens New 50mm 1.8 Lens

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